George Chandler

George Chandler (June 30, 1898 – June 10, 1985) was an American actor best known for playing the character of "Uncle Petrie" on the television series Lassie. He was born in Waukegan, Illinois, and died in Panorama City, California, at the age of eighty-six.

Chandler appeared six times in Bill Williams's western series The Adventures of Kit Carson (1951–1955) in episodes entitled "Law of Boot Hill", "Lost Treasure of the Panamints", "Trails Westward", "The Wrong Man", "Trail to Bordertown", and "Gunsmoke Justice". He guest starred on the Reed Hadley CBS legal drama The Public Defender. He appeared as the character Ames in the two-part episode "King of the Dakotas" in the 1955 NBC western anthology series Frontier. In 1954-55, he appeared in two episodes of the NBC sitcom It's a Great Life. In 1958, Chandler appeared as Cleveland McMasters opposite Marjorie Main as the frontierswoman Cassie Tanner in the episode "The Cassie Tanner Story" on NBC's Wagon Train.

In 1961-62 television season, Chandler co-starred with Robert Sterling, Reta Shaw, Jimmy Hawkins, Burt Mustin, and Christine White in CBS's comedy series, Ichabod and Me.

Read more about George ChandlerPartial Filmography

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