General Teaching Council For England

The General Teaching Council for England (GTCE) was the professional body for teaching in England. The GTC was established by the Teaching and Higher Education Act 1998 which set two aims: "to contribute to improving standards of teaching and the quality of learning, and to maintain and improve standards of professional conduct among teachers, in the interests of the public". The GTC was abolished on 31 March 2012 with some of its functions being assumed by a new body known as the Teaching Agency, an executive agency of the Department for Education.

Read more about General Teaching Council For England:  Functions, Composition of The Council, Primary Sources, Abolition

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General Teaching Council For England - Abolition
... on 2 June 2010, his intention to seek authority from Parliament to abolish the General Teaching Council for England ... the demise of the GTC and criticised the role of school teaching trade unions causing the profession to become little more than an extension to the civil service ...

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