Gen12 - Publication History

Publication History

The story takes place in the 90s, but is filled with flashbacks that take place in the late 70s/early 80s, following events in the Team 7: Dead Reckoning mini-series.

After the death of Miles Craven, head of International Operations, the US government orders commander Thomas Morgan to investigate Miles Craven's secret operation, Project Genesis, the resulting defection of John Lynch and the disappearance of Ivana Baiul. The main subjects of Project Genesis were the members of Team 7 and Morgan tracks down their friends and families to find out what happened between Craven and Team 7.

The purpose of the Gen12 series was to provide the connection between the stories in Chuck Dixon's Team 7-series (taking place in the 70s) and the Wildstorm titles taking place in the 90s. This made Gen12 a very continuity-filled series. The series was filled with references to and characters from Gen¹³, Divine Right, Deathblow and many more.

Read more about this topic:  Gen12

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