Gen12 - Fictional History

Fictional History

Miles Craven, head of International Operations was determined to create superhuman soldiers for his army and therefore started Project: Genesis. The most promising method of creating superhumans was the Gen-factor, a substance with the ability to bestow superhuman powers on people exposed to it, making them Gen-actives. The Gen-factor was discovered by Dr. Simon Tsung, who had extracted it from Ethan McCain, a baby he had found with superhuman powers. Craven used the Gen-factor on many subjects, but all either died, went insane or mutated into monstrous beings. He finally succeeded with Team 7 and the survivors of the experiment were labeled Gen12. Later other Gen12-superhumans were seen, but the Team 7 members appeared to be the most successful and the most powerful of the Gen12.

A revival of Project Genesis about 20 years later produced Gen¹³. The name Gen¹³ is only used for the members of the superhero group Gen¹³, while other Gen-Actives of their generation simply refer to themselves as Gen-Active (like DV8) Gen12 and Gen¹³ refer to generations of Americans.

Read more about this topic:  Gen12

Other articles related to "fictional history":

SV-51 - Fictional History
... According to the novelization of Macross Frontier, the SV-51 continued to be produced in former Anti-U.N ... territories afterwards and was eventually re-engined with thermonuclear turbofans as the U.N ...
Thalarion - DC Comics - Fictional History
... On the island Zeus created a kingdom city made of clear crystal and a river of gold ... Zeus also provided the island with winged lions and winged horses so that the Gargareans could travel by air ...
Subterranea (comics) - Inhabitants - Lava Men - Fictional History
... Jinku plotted to use the Mole Man's machine to activate all volcanoes on the Earth ... Molto was mortally wounded by Jinku, but warned Thor and the Human Torch about Jinku before dying ...

Famous quotes containing the words history and/or fictional:

    Revolutions are the periods of history when individuals count most.
    Norman Mailer (b. 1923)

    One of the proud joys of the man of letters—if that man of letters is an artist—is to feel within himself the power to immortalize at will anything he chooses to immortalize. Insignificant though he may be, he is conscious of possessing a creative divinity. God creates lives; the man of imagination creates fictional lives which may make a profound and as it were more living impression on the world’s memory.
    Edmond De Goncourt (1822–1896)