French Academy of Sciences

The French Academy of Sciences (French: Académie des sciences) is a learned society, founded in 1666 by Louis XIV at the suggestion of Jean-Baptiste Colbert, to encourage and protect the spirit of French scientific research. It was at the forefront of scientific developments in Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries. It is one of the earliest academies of sciences.

Read more about French Academy Of Sciences:  History, The Academy Today, Medals, Awards and Prizes, People of The Academy

Famous quotes containing the words sciences, french and/or academy:

    These modern ingenious sciences and arts do not affect me as those more venerable arts of hunting and fishing, and even of husbandry in its primitive and simple form; as ancient and honorable trades as the sun and moon and winds pursue, coeval with the faculties of man, and invented when these were invented. We do not know their John Gutenberg, or Richard Arkwright, though the poets would fain make them to have been gradually learned and taught.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    ... the English are very fond of being entertained, and ... they regard the French and the American people as destined by Heaven to amuse them.
    M. E. W. Sherwood (1826–1903)

    I realized early on that the academy and the literary world alike—and I don’t think there really is a distinction between the two—are always dominated by fools, knaves, charlatans and bureaucrats. And that being the case, any human being, male or female, of whatever status, who has a voice of her or his own, is not going to be liked.
    Harold Bloom (b. 1930)