Franklin Pierce Adams

Franklin Pierce Adams (November 15, 1881, Chicago, Illinois – March 23, 1960, New York City, New York) was an American columnist, well known by his initials F.P.A., and wit, best known for his newspaper column, "The Conning Tower", and his appearances as a regular panelist on radio's Information Please. A prolific writer of light verse, he was a member of the Algonquin Round Table of the 1920s and 1930s.

Read more about Franklin Pierce Adams:  New York Newspaper Columnist, Satires, Radio, Film Portrayal, Quotes

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United States Circuit Court - Judges
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... served under 1 Ambrose Dudley Mann Virginia March 23, 1853 - May 8, 1855 Franklin Pierce William L ... William Hunter Rhode Island May 9, 1855 - October 31, 1855 Franklin Pierce William L ... Addison Thomas New York November 1, 1855 - April 3, 1857 Franklin Pierce James Buchanan William L ...

Famous quotes containing the words franklin pierce adams, franklin pierce, pierce adams, adams and/or pierce:

    Too much Truth
    Is uncouth.
    Franklin Pierce Adams (1881–1960)

    Too much Truth
    Is uncouth.
    Franklin Pierce Adams (1881–1960)

    The trouble with this country is that there are too many politicians who believe, with a conviction based on experience, that you can fool all of the people all of the time.
    —Franklin Pierce Adams (1881–1960)

    American society is a sort of flat, fresh-water pond which absorbs silently, without reaction, anything which is thrown into it.
    —Henry Brooks Adams (1838–1918)

    But wise men pierce this rotten diction and fasten words again to visible things; so that picturesque language is at once a commanding certificate that he who employs it, is a man in alliance with truth and God.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)