France

Some articles on france:

Napoleon - Reforms
... higher education, a tax code, road and sewer systems, and established the Banque de France (central bank) ... which regulated public worship in France ... achievements the order is still the highest decoration in France ...
Napoleon - Legacy - Criticism
... and disorder in post-Revolutionary France ... and decision to reinstate slavery in France's oversea colonies are controversial and have an impact on his reputation ... must reflect the loss of status for France and needless deaths brought by his rule historian Victor Davis Hanson writes, "After all, the military record is unquestioned—17 years of wars, perhaps ...
Economy Of Saint Pierre And Miquelon
... with Canada, although it represents only 25 percent of what France had sought ... The islands are heavily subsidized by France, which benefits the standard of living ...
Napoleon - Titles, Styles, Honours and Arms
... Emperor Napoleon I of France House of Bonaparte Political offices Preceded by French Directory Provisional Consul of France 11 November – 12 December 1799 Became Consul New title ...
Foreign Relations Of Tunisia - France
... Tunisia and France retain a special relationship due to their history, geographic location, and economic relationship ... In France there is a sizeable Tunisian diaspora, and the French language is widely used in Tunisia ... Ranked by country, France receives the largest amount of Tunisian exports, and France is number-one regarding Tunisian imports also ...

More definitions of "France":

  • (noun): A republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe.
    Synonyms: French Republic

Famous quotes containing the word france:

    The law, in its majestic equality, forbids rich and poor alike to sleep under bridges, beg in the streets or steal bread.
    —Anatole France (1844–1924)

    It is not enough that France should be regarded as a country which enjoys the remains of a freedom acquired long ago. If she is still to count in the world—and if she does not intend to, she may as well perish—she must be seen by her own citizens and by all men as an ever-flowing source of liberty. There must not be a single genuine lover of freedom in the whole world who can have a valid reason for hating France.
    Simone Weil (1909–1943)

    In France one must adapt oneself to the fragrance of a urinal.
    Gertrude Stein (1874–1946)