Fortified Wine

Fortified wine is wine to which a distilled beverage (usually brandy) has been added. Fortified wine is distinguished from spirits made from wine in that spirits are produced by means of distillation, while fortified wine is simply wine that has had a spirit added to it. Many different styles of fortified wine have been developed, including Port, Sherry, Madeira, Marsala, Commandaria wine and the aromatized wine Vermouth.

Read more about Fortified WineProduction, Terminology

Other articles related to "fortified wine, fortified wines, wines, wine":

Fortified Wine - Terminology
... Fortified wines are often termed dessert wines in the United States to avoid association with hard drinking ... Under European Union legislation, a liqueur wine is a fortified wine that contains not less than 17.5% abv (except for certain quality liqueur wines) and that meets many ...
Beaumes De Venise AOC
... Beaumes de Venise is an appellation of wines from the eastern central region of the southern half of the Rhône Valley ... It produces wines of two distinctly different types 1 ... A sweet fortified wine of the type vin doux naturel (VDN), under the designation Muscat de Beaumes de Venise ...
Alcoholic Beverages - Definitions - Fortified Beverages
... Fortified wine Fortified wine is wine with an added distilled beverage (usually brandy) ... Fortified wine is distinguished from spirits made from wine in that spirits are produced by means of distillation, while fortified wine is simply wine ... Many different styles of fortified wine have been developed, including Port, Sherry, Madeira, Marsala, Commandaria wine and the aromatized wine Vermouth ...

Famous quotes containing the words wine and/or fortified:

    when wine redeems the sight,
    Narrowing the mustard scansions of the eyes,
    Hart Crane (1899–1932)

    The self ... might be regarded as a sort of citadel of the mind, fortified without and containing selected treasures within, while love is an undivided share in the rest of the universe. In a healthy mind each contributes to the growth of the other: what we love intensely or for a long time we are likely to bring within the citadel, and to assert as part of ourself. On the other hand, it is only on the basis of a substantial self that a person is capable of progressive sympathy or love.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864–1929)