Florida International University School of Hospitality & Tourism Management

Florida International University School Of Hospitality & Tourism Management

The Chaplin School of Hospitality & Tourism Management at Florida International University, located at the Biscayne Bay Campus in North Miami, Florida in the United States is one of the university's 26 schools and colleges. The University was chartered in 1965 and opened in 1972.

Each year, over 1,900 undergraduate and graduate students enroll at FIU. Students and graduates of the School represent every state and 100 countries.

The School offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Hospitality Management, Master of Science in Hospitality Management (available on campus and via distance learning), and Executive Master of Science in Hospitality Management (available on campus and via distance learning) Degree Programs, as well as Certificate Programs in various Hotel, Restaurant, Hospitality, Travel and Tourism specializations. A Doctorate degree in Business Administration with a specialization in Hospitality and Tourism Management is also offered.

On-campus housing is available at the Bay Vista Apartments through the housing community.

Read more about Florida International University School Of Hospitality & Tourism Management:  Facilities

Famous quotes containing the words tourism, management, hospitality, florida, university and/or school:

    In the middle ages people were tourists because of their religion, whereas now they are tourists because tourism is their religion.
    Robert Runcie (b. 1921)

    The Management Area of Cherokee
    National Forest, interested in fish,
    Has mapped Tellico and Bald Rivers
    And North River, with the tributaries
    Brookshire Branch and Sugar Cove Creed:
    A fishy map for facile fishery....
    Allen Tate (1899–1979)

    It is remarkable that, notwithstanding the universal favor with which the New Testament is outwardly received, and even the bigotry with which it is defended, there is no hospitality shown to, there is no appreciation of, the order of truth with which it deals. I know of no book that has so few readers. There is none so truly strange, and heretical, and unpopular. To Christians, no less than Greeks and Jews, it is foolishness and a stumbling-block.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    In Florida consider the flamingo,
    Its color passion but its neck a question.
    Robert Penn Warren (1905–1989)

    It is in the nature of allegory, as opposed to symbolism, to beg the question of absolute reality. The allegorist avails himself of a formal correspondence between “ideas” and “things,” both of which he assumes as given; he need not inquire whether either sphere is “real” or whether, in the final analysis, reality consists in their interaction.
    Charles, Jr. Feidelson, U.S. educator, critic. Symbolism and American Literature, ch. 1, University of Chicago Press (1953)

    East, west, north, south, or like a school broke up,
    Each hurries toward his home and sporting-place.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)