Flavor

Flavor or flavour is the sensory impression of a food or other substance, and is determined mainly by the chemical senses of taste and smell. The "trigeminal senses", which detect chemical irritants in the mouth and throat as well as temperature and texture, are also very important to the overall Gestalt of flavor perception. The flavor of the food, as such, can be altered with natural or artificial flavorants, which affect these senses.

Flavorant is defined as a substance that gives another substance flavor, altering the characteristics of the solute, causing it to become sweet, sour, tangy, etc.

Of the three chemical senses, smell is the main determinant of a food item's flavor. While the taste of food is limited to sweet, sour, bitter, salty, umami (savory) – pungent or piquant and metallic, the seven basic tastes – the smells of a food are potentially limitless. A food's flavor, therefore, can be easily altered by changing its smell while keeping its taste similar. Nowhere is this better exemplified than in artificially flavored jellies, soft drinks and candies, which, while made of bases with a similar taste, have dramatically different flavors due to the use of different scents or fragrances. The flavorings of commercially produced food products are typically created by flavorists.

Although the terms "flavoring" or "flavorant" in common language denote the combined chemical sensations of taste and smell, the same terms are usually used in the fragrance and flavors industry to refer to edible chemicals and extracts that alter the flavor of food and food products through the sense of smell. Due to the high cost or unavailability of natural flavor extracts, most commercial flavorants are nature-identical, which means that they are the chemical equivalent of natural flavors but chemically synthesized rather than being extracted from the source materials. Identification of nature-identical flavorants are done using technology such as headspace techniques.

Read more about Flavor:  Flavorants or Flavorings, Dietary Restrictions, Flavor Creation, Determination, Scientific Resources

Other articles related to "flavor":

Bake N Shake - Ingredients
... Shake 'n Bake Original Pork flavor contains the following ingredients enriched wheat flour (wheat flour, niacin, iron, thiamin mononitrate Vitamin B1, riboflavin ... Barbecue flavor Shake 'n Bake includes sugar, maltodextrin, salt, modified food starch, spice, partially hydrogenated soybean and cottonseed oil, brown sugar, mustard seed flour, dried onions ...
Color–flavor Locking
... Color–flavor locking (CFL) is a phenomenon that is expected to occur in ultra-high-density strange matter, a form of quark matter ... The quarks form Cooper pairs, whose color properties are correlated with their flavor properties in an one-to-one correspondence between three color pairs and three ... the Standard Model of particle physics, the color-flavor-locked phase is the highest-density phase of three-flavor matter ...
Coconut Sugar - Taste and Flavor
... However, since organic coconut sugar is not highly processed, the color, sweetness and flavor can vary depending on different factors ... Coconut sugar's color, sweetness and flavor can vary slightly from packaging to packaging depending on the coconut species used, season when it was ...
London Charles - Flavor of Love 2
... Davis was a contestant on the second season of VH1's Flavor of Love ... She went on to win the competition when Flavor Flav chose her over Tiffany 'New York' Pollard, who returned after previously named the runner-up on the ...
Apache (rapper)
... New Jersey in the late 1980s as a front man for the Flavor Unit, a hip-hop group ... He first appeared on the Flavor Unit album, The 45 King Presents The Flavor Unit, in 1990 ...

Famous quotes containing the word flavor:

    All my good reading, you mught say, was done in the toilet.... There are passages in Ulysses which can be read only in the toilet—if one wants to extract the full flavor of their content.
    Henry Miller (1891–1980)

    A widow is a fascinating being with the flavor of maturity, the spice of experience, the piquancy of novelty, the tang of practised coquetry, and the halo of one man’s approval.
    Helen Rowland (1875–1950)

    No man ever quite believes in any other man. One may believe in an idea absolutely, but not in a man. In the highest confidence there is always a flavor of doubt—a feeling, half instinctive and half logical, that, after all, the scoundrel may have something up his sleeve.
    —H.L. (Henry Lewis)