Flag of South Australia

The current state flag of South Australia, was officially adopted by the government of South Australia in 1904.

The flag is based on the defaced British Blue Ensign with the state badge located in the fly. The badge is a gold disc featuring a Piping Shrike with its wings outstretched. The badge is believed to have been originally designed by Robert Craig, a teacher at the School of Arts in Adelaide, and officially gazetted on 14 January 1904.

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Flag Of South Australia - Previous Flags
... The first flag of South Australia was adopted in 1870 ... South Australia then adopted a second flag in 1876, also a Blue Ensign, with a new badge ... This flag was adopted after a request from the Colonial Office for a new design over the old one due to its similarity to the flags of New Zealand and Victoria ...

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