Fit

Fit or FIT may refer to:

Fitness
  • Physical fitness, how well a person is suited for physical tasks
  • FitTV, cable television network about physical fitness
  • Wii Fit, Nintendo Wii video game about physical fitness
  • Fitness (biology), how capable a being is at successfully passing on its genes
  • Physical attractiveness, in British or Irish slang, usually with sexual connotations, generally used to describe an attractive man or woman
  • FIT magazine, about physical fitness, published by Bob Anderson (runner)
Other uses
  • Direction of fit, the mind-world relation in philosophy of mind
  • Honda Fit (also known as Honda Jazz), a 5-door hatchback car
  • Engineering fit, a classification system for the mating of two mechanical components
  • Curve fitting
  • Fit, in time management
  • Direction of fit, the word-world relation in speech act theory
  • Fit, or Fytte, a canto, a section or part of a poem
  • Fit, another term for a seizure or convulsion
  • Fit, British slang word for attractive
  • Fit (2008 play)
  • Feed-in tariff

FIT may refer to:

  • Failures in time, a unit rate of failure, used in reliability engineering
  • Feature integration theory, a theory to explain visual attention
  • Feed-in tariff, referred to solar electricity energy financial incentives
  • Finite integration technique, a numerical method for simulating electro-magnetical problems
  • First isomorphism theorem, that describe the relationship between quotients, homomorphisms, and subobjects (mathematics)
  • Five intersecting tetrahedra, a compound solid shape
  • Flight interception trap, a method used for trapping flying insects
  • Flow Indicator Transmitter (see Flow measurement), abbreviation used in piping and instrumentation diagrams
  • Frame Interline Transfer, a type of CCD (charge-coupled device) imager
  • Framework for Integrated Test, an open-source software tool for automated customer tests
  • Filton Abbey Wood railway station has National Rail code FIT
  • Fecal Immunochemical Testing, a type of Fecal occult blood test
  • Uden aka Chappie aka the Ultimate Fittie aka UltraMegaSafe

Read more about Fit:  Organizations

Other articles related to "fit, fits":

Luigi Rosselli - Selected Commercial Projects
1986 Leo Schofield's offices fitout 1988 Frank Moore Shop fit-out, San Francisco, USA 1989 Kerry McGee Fashion Warehouse, Office and Manufacturing premises, Alexandria 1991 Barrister's Chambers office fit-out ...
List Of Number-one Singles Of 1982 (Ireland)
20 February Oh Julie Shakin' Stevens 27 February The Lion Sleeps Tonight Tight Fit 6 March The Lion Sleeps Tonight Tight Fit 13 March The Lion Sleeps Tonight Tight Fit 20 March The Lion ...
Staking (manufacturing)
... Staking is the process of connecting two components by creating an interference fit between the two pieces ... One workpiece has a hole in it while the other has a boss that fits within the hole ... The boss is undersized so that it is a slip fit ...
Lack-of-fit Sum Of Squares
... In statistics, a sum of squares due to lack of fit, or more tersely a lack-of-fit sum of squares, is one of the components of a partition of the sum of squares in an ...
Lack-of-fit Test
... In statistics, a lack-of-fit test is any of many tests of a null hypothesis that a proposed statistical model fits well ... See Goodness of fit Lack-of-fit sum of squares ...

Famous quotes containing the word fit:

    Many women are surprised by the intensity of their maternal pull and the conflict it brings to their competing roles. This is the precise point at which many women feel the stress of the work/family dilemma most keenly. They realize that they may have a price to pay for wanting to be both professionals and mothers. They feel guilty for not being at work, and angry for being manipulated into feeling this guilt. . . . They don’t quite fit at home. They don’t quite fit at work.
    Deborah J. Swiss (20th century)

    Rice and peas fit into that category of dishes where two ordinary foods, combined together, ignite a pleasure far beyond the capacity of either of its parts alone. Like rhubarb and strawberries, apple pie and cheese, roast pork and sage, the two tastes and textures meld together into the sort of subtle transcendental oneness that we once fantasized would be our experience when we finally found the ideal mate.
    John Thorne, U.S. cookbook writer. Simple Cooking, “Rice and Peas: A Preface with Recipes,” Viking Penguin (1987)

    ... nothing seems completely to differentiate the poor but poverty. We find no adjectives to fit them, as a whole, only those of which Want is the mother. “Miserable” covers many; “shabby” most, and I am sadly aware that, in a large majority of minds, “disagreeable” includes them all.
    Albion Fellows Bacon (1865–1933)