Fishing Reel

A fishing reel is a cylindrical device attached to a fishing rod used in winding and stowing line.

Modern fishing reels usually have fittings aiding in casting for distance and accuracy, as well as retrieving line. Fishing reels are traditionally used in the recreational sport of angling and competitive casting. They are typically attached to a fishing rod, though some specialized reels are mounted directly to boat gunwales or transoms.

The earliest known illustration of a fishing reel is from Chinese paintings and records beginning about 1195 AD. Fishing reels first appeared in England around 1650 AD, and by the 1760s, London tackle shops were advertising multiplying or gear-retrieved reels. The first popular American fishing reel appeared in the U.S. around 1820.

Read more about Fishing ReelHistory, Manufacturers

Other articles related to "fishing reel, reels, fishing, fishing reels":

Fishing Reel - Manufacturers
... Abu Garcia Daiwa Seiko Corporation Okuma Penn Reels Scientific Anglers Shimano Shakespeare Fishing Tackle ...
Fishing Tackle - Fishing Reels
... A fishing reel is a device used for the deployment and retrieval of a fishing line using a spool mounted on an axle ... Fishing reels are traditionally used in angling ... They are most often used in conjunction with a fishing rod, though some specialized reels are mounted on crossbows or to boat gunwales or transoms ...
List Of Chinese Inventions - Shang and Later - F
... Fishing reel In literary records, the earliest evidence of the fishing reel comes from a 4th century AD work entitled Lives of Famous Immortals ... The earliest known depiction of a fishing reel comes from a Southern Song (1127–1279) painting done in 1195 by Ma Yuan (c ... on a small sampan boat while casting out his fishing line ...

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    William Plomer (1903–1973)

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