First Declension

The first declension is a category of mostly feminine nouns in Latin and Ancient Greek with the defining feature of a long ā (either analysed as a part of the stem or case-ending). In Greek grammar, it is also called the alpha declension, since its forms have the letter α, at least in the plural.

In Latin and Greek grammar, the first declension is analyzed as a thematic declension. But its lack of a Proto-Indo-European thematic vowel (o or e) and of any nominative singular ending (ordinarily -s or -os) doesn't neatly place it within either of the Proto-Indo-European nominal categories, thematic and athematic. Therefore, it is assumed to be a newer formation: a suffix based on the neuter plural ending *-(e)h₂, forming a collective noun.

Other articles related to "first declension, declension":

First Declension - Ancient Greek - Greek Adjectives
... The feminine of first- and second-declension adjectives uses the -ā class of the first declension -os, -ā/ē, -on First- and third-declension adjectives, including participles in -nt-, use the -(y ...
Slovene Nouns - Declensions - Feminine Declension - First Declension
... This declension consists of nouns that end in -a ... The model noun for this declension is lipa, lime (or linden) tree ... Feminine First (-a) Declension Number Case Singular Dual Plural Nominative (1) lipa lipi lipe Genitive (2) lipe lip lip Dative (3) lipi lipama lipam Accusative (4) lipo ...

Famous quotes containing the word declension:

    And what if my descendants lose the flower
    Through natural declension of the soul,
    Through too much business with the passing hour,
    Through too much play, or marriage with a fool?
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)