Finery Forge

A finery forge is a hearth used to produce wrought iron, through the decarburization of the pig iron produced by blast furnaces. Finery forges were used in the early modern period, before wrought iron had been superseded by steel.


Read more about Finery Forge:  History, Process

Other articles related to "finery forge, finery":

Finery Forge - Process
... In the finery, a workman known as the "finer" remelted pig iron so as to oxidise the carbon (and silicon) ... water-powered hammer (see trip hammer) and returned to the finery ... The fuel in the finery had to be charcoal, because impurities in any mineral fuel would affect the quality of the iron ...
List Of Chinese Inventions - Shang and Later - F
... Finery forge In addition to accidental lumps of low-carbon wrought iron produced by excessive injected air in Chinese cupola furnaces, the ancient Chinese also created ... Pigott speculates that the finery forge existed in the previous Warring States Period (403–221 BC), due to the fact that there are wrought iron items from China dating to that period ...
Types of Forges - Finery Forge
... A finery forge is a water-powered mill where pig iron is refined into wrought iron. ...

Famous quotes containing the words forge and/or finery:

    We forge gradually our greatest instrument for understanding the world—introspection. We discover that humanity may resemble us very considerably—that the best way of knowing the inwardness of our neighbors is to know ourselves.
    Walter Lippmann (1889–1974)

    Frequently also some fair-weather finery ripped off a vessel by a storm near the coast was nailed up against an outhouse. I saw fastened to a shed near the lighthouse a long new sign with the words “ANGLO SAXON” on it in large gilt letters, as if it were a useless part which the ship could afford to lose, or which the sailors had discharged at the same time with the pilot. But it interested somewhat as if it had been a part of the Argo, clipped off in passing through the Symplegades.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)