Field Artillery Branch (United States)

Field Artillery Branch (United States)

The Field Artillery branch was founded on 17 November 1775 by the Continental Congress, which unanimously elected Henry Knox "Colonel of the Regiment of Artillery". The regiment formally entered service on 1 January 1776. Although Field Artillery and Air Defense Artillery are separate branches, both inherit the traditions of the Artillery branch.

Read more about Field Artillery Branch (United States):  Mission Statement, History, Publications, Weapons, Current, Organization

Other articles related to "artillery":

Field Artillery Branch (United States) - Organization
... the Revolution there was only one battalion of four companies of artillery ... In 1794 a Corps of Artillerists and Engineers"was organized,which included the four companies of artillerythen in service and had sixteen companies in four ... The Engineers were separated from the Artilleryand the latter formed into one regiment of 20 companies ...

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