Field Artillery Battery

Some articles on artillery, field artillery battery, field artillery, battery:

Australian Reserve Artillery Brigade
... The Reserve Artillery Brigade was formed in Egypt in January 1915 as the Artillery Training Depot ... The Brigade still known as the Artillery Training Depot arrived in England on 20 June 1916 ... The Brigade was officily renamed the Reserve Artillery Brigade on 28 November 1916 ...
Myanmar Army - Formation and Structure - Directorate of Artillery
1 Artillery Battalion was formed in 1952 with three artillery batteries under the Directorate of Artillery Corps ... A further three artillery battalions were formed in the late 1952 ... Since 2000, the Directorate of Artillery Corps has overseen the expansion of Artillery Operations Commands(AOC) from two to 10 ...
1st Regiment, Royal Australian Artillery - History - World War I - World War I Formation
... 1st Field Artillery Battery 2nd Field Artillery Battery 3rd Field Artillery Battery 101st Field Artillery (Howitzer) Battery 1st Brigade Ammunition Column ...
Australian Army Artillery Units, World War I
1st Division Artillery Formed August 1914 and assigned to 1st Division ... Column August 1914 - past November 1918 1st Field Artillery Brigade August 1914 - past November 1918 1st Field Artillery Battery 2nd Field Artillery Battery 3rd Field Artillery Battery 101st ...
Artillery - Modern Operations - Air Burst
... The destructiveness of artillery bombardments can be enhanced when some or all of the shells are set for airburst, meaning that they explode in the air above the ... Since December 1944 (Battle of the Bulge), proximity fuzed artillery shells have been available that take the guesswork out of this process ...

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