Feminist Literary Criticism

Feminist literary criticism is literary criticism informed by feminist theory, or by the politics of feminism more broadly. Its history has been broad and varied, from classic works of nineteenth-century women authors such as George Eliot and Margaret Fuller to cutting-edge theoretical work in women's studies and gender studies by "third-wave" authors. In the most general and simple terms, feminist literary criticism before the 1970s—in the first and second waves of feminism—was concerned with the politics of women's authorship and the representation of women's condition within literature.

Since the development of more complex conceptions of gender and subjectivity and third-wave feminism, feminist literary criticism has taken a variety of new routes, namely in the tradition of the Frankfurt School's critical theory. It has considered gender in the terms of Freudian and Lacanian psychoanalysis, as part of the deconstruction of existing relations of power, and as a concrete political investment. It has been closely associated with the birth and growth of queer studies. The more traditionally central feminist concern with the representation and politics of women's lives has continued to play an active role in criticism.

Lisa Tuttle has defined feminist theory as asking "new questions of old texts." She cites the goals of feminist criticism as: (1) To develop and uncover a female tradition of writing, (2) to interpret symbolism of women's writing so that it will not be lost or ignored by the male point of view, (3) to rediscover old texts, (4) to analyze women writers and their writings from a female perspective, (5) to resist sexism in literature, and (6) to increase awareness of the sexual politics of language and style.

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Feminist Literary Criticism - Feminist Literary Critics
... Prominent feminist literary critics include Isobel Armstrong, Nancy Armstrong, Barbara Bowen, Jennifer DeVere Brody, Laura Brown, Margaret Anne Doody, Eva Figes, Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar ...
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... most of his life as a civil servant, supplementing his literary income he eventually rose to become adviser to the National Library of Egypt ... In his literary career, he published four collections of short stories, one novel (Umm Hashem's Lamp), and many articles and other short stories besides ... He was editor of the literary magazine Al-Majalla from 1961 to 1971, when that publication was banned in Egypt ...
Feminist Criticism
... Feminist literary criticism is literary criticism informed by feminist theory, or by the politics of feminism more broadly ... In the most general and simple terms, feminist literary criticism before the 1970s—in the first and second waves of feminism—was concerned with the politics ... complex conceptions of gender and subjectivity and third-wave feminism, feminist literary criticism has taken a variety of new routes, namely in the tradition of the Frankfurt School's ...
Northfield Mount Hermon School - Student Life - Literary
... The Bridge – The student newspaper expresses the point of view of the community ... Name was temporarily changed to "The Hermon Echo," but was reverted back to "The Bridge" in the fall of 2007 ...
Feminist Theory - Disciplines - Literary Theory
... Main article Feminist literary criticism See also Gynocriticism Feminist literary criticism is literary criticism informed by feminist theories or politics ... In the most general, feminist literary criticism before the 1970s was concerned with the politics of women's authorship and the representation of women's condition within literature ...

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