Feet

Some articles on feet:

Mountain West Conference - Elevation - Elevation By Conference
... campus elevation Mountain West 3,473 feet (2012), 3,650 feet (2013) Big Sky 2,968 feet WAC 1,967 feet Summit League 1,295 feet Pac 12 1,205 feet Elevation data obtained from the USGS Geographic Names ...
USS Scamp (SS-277) - Seventh War Patrol
... dived and the destroyers passed overhead without noticing her presence a scant 10 feet (3.0 m) below the surface ... All hands were knocked off their feet by the explosion and all power was lost ... At just below 300 feet (91 m), she began to hang on, then started up ...
Passes Of The Silvretta And Rätikon Ranges
... elevation Jamjoch Guarda to Galtur Snow 0 meters 112 ... feet Fuorcla del Confin Silvretta Pass to the Vermunt Glacier Snow 3058 meters 10,033 feet Buinlucke Guarda to Patenen Snow 3054 ...
Lyon County, Nevada - Transportation
... The Silver Springs Airport with 7200 feet long runway capable of accepting 737's, its runway lights are visible when driving down on Fir Street from ...
Nine-point Circle - Significant Nine Points
... Points G, H, and I are the feet of the altitudes of the triangle ... For an acute triangle, six of the points (the midpoints and altitude feet) lie on the triangle itself for an obtuse triangle two of the altitudes have feet outside the ...

Famous quotes containing the word feet:

    There is, however, this consolation to the most way-worn traveler, upon the dustiest road, that the path his feet describe is so perfectly symbolical of human life,—now climbing the hills, now descending into the vales. From the summits he beholds the heavens and the horizon, from the vales he looks up to the heights again. He is treading his old lessons still, and though he may be very weary and travel-worn, it is yet sincere experience.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    As we approached the log house,... the projecting ends of the logs lapping over each other irregularly several feet at the corners gave it a very rich and picturesque look, far removed from the meanness of weather-boards. It was a very spacious, low building, about eighty feet long, with many large apartments ... a style of architecture not described by Vitruvius, I suspect, though possibly hinted at in the biography of Orpheus.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    In the eighth, Hermanski smashed a drive to the scoreboard. Henrich backed against the board and leaped either four or fourteen feet into the air. He stayed aloft so long he looked like an empty uniform hanging in its locker. When he came down he had the ball.
    Walter Wellesley (Red)