Extensive Farming

Extensive farming or extensive agriculture (as opposed to intensive farming) is an agricultural production system that uses small inputs of labour, fertilizers, and capital, relative to the land area being farmed.

Extensive farming most commonly refers to sheep and cattle farming in areas with low agricultural productivity, but can also refer to large-scale growing of wheat, barley and other grain crops in areas like the Murray-Darling Basin. Here, owing to the extreme age and poverty of the soils, yields per hectare are very low, but the flat terrain and very large farm sizes mean yields per unit of labour are high. Nomadic herding is an extreme example of extensive farming, where herders move their animals to use feed from occasional rainfalls.


Read more about Extensive Farming:  Geography, Advantages, Disadvantages

Other articles related to "extensive farming, farming":

Extensive Farming - Disadvantages
... Extensive farming can have the following problems Yields tend to be much lower than with intensive farming in the short term ... low stocking rates can be dangerous), as is the case with intensive farming ...

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