Extended Precision

Extended precision refers to floating point number formats that provide greater precision and more exponent range than the basic floating point formats. In contrast to extended precision, arbitrary-precision arithmetic refers to implementations of much larger numeric types (with a storage count that usually is not a power of two) using special software (or, rarely, hardware).

Read more about Extended PrecisionX86 Extended Precision Format

Other articles related to "extended, precision, extended precision":

IBM Floating Point Architecture - Extended-precision 128-bit
... Extended-precision (quadruple-precision) was added to the System/370 series and was available on some S/360 models (S/360-85, -195, and others by special request or ... The extended-precision mantissa (fraction) field is wider, and the extended-precision number is stored as two double words (16 bytes) High-Order Part 56 ... bits ... A conversion of extended precision hexadecimal float to decimal string would require at least 35 significant digits in order to convert back to the same hexadecimal float ...
X86 Extended Precision Format - Need For The 80-bit Format
... A notable example of the need for a minimum of 64 bits of precision in the significand of the extended precision format is the need to avoid precision loss when performing exponentiation on double precision values ... in sequence to perform exponentiation using the equation In order to avoid precision loss, the intermediate results "log2 x" and "y log2 x" must be computed with much higher precision because effectively both ... An IEEE 754 double precision value can be represented as where s is the sign of the exponent (either 0 or 1), E is the unbiased exponent which is an integer that ranges from 0 to 1023, and M is the ...

Famous quotes containing the words precision and/or extended:

    One can prove or refute anything at all with words. Soon people will perfect language technology to such an extent that they’ll be proving with mathematical precision that twice two is seven.
    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860–1904)

    The civility which money will purchase, is rarely extended to those who have none.
    Charles Dickens (1812–1870)