Extended Metaphor

An extended metaphor, also known as a conceit or megametaphor, is when an author exploits a single metaphor or analogy at length through multiple linked vehicles, tenors, and grounds. Tenor is the subject of the metaphor, vehicle is image or subject that carries the weight of the comparison, and ground is the shared proprieties of the two compared subjects. Another way to think of extended metaphors is in terms of implications of a base metaphor. These implications are repeatedly emphasized, discovered, rediscovered, and progressed in new ways.

Other articles related to "extended metaphor, metaphor, extended":

Extended Metaphor - Examples - Robert Frost
... The commonly used “life-is-a-journey” metaphor conceptualized by Lakoff and Johnson (1980 and 1989) is extended in Robert Frost's The Road Not Taken ... if the reader has knowledge of the “life-is-a-journey” metaphor ...
Rape (song)
... Nowhere is this balancing act more evident than on "Rape," a rather disquieting extended metaphor for his mastery of hip-hop (other MCs just "ain't f*ckin' it right")." As Huey points out, "Ra ... sodomize the bassline —Pharoahe Monch, "Rape" Personification and extended metaphor are techniques widely employed by hip-hop lyricists ...

Famous quotes containing the words metaphor and/or extended:

    A black boxer’s career is the perfect metaphor for the career of a black male. Every day is like being in the gym, sparring with impersonal opponents as one faces the rudeness and hostility that a black male must confront in the United States, where he is the object of both fear and fascination.
    Ishmael Reed (b. 1938)

    No: until I want the protection of Massachusetts to be extended to me in some distant Southern port, where my liberty is endangered, or until I am bent solely on building up an estate at home by peaceful enterprise, I can afford to refuse allegiance to Massachusetts, and her right to my property and life. It costs me less in every sense to incur the penalty of disobedience to the State than it would to obey. I should feel as if I were worth less in that case.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)