Exercise Prescription

Exercise prescription is the referral of patients to exercise programmes. The term is also used to describe the development of exercise programs.

Read more about Exercise Prescription:  Patient Referral, Exercise Program Development

Other articles related to "exercise, exercise prescription, exercises":

Personal Trainer - Employment Characteristics
... Almost all personal trainers and group exercise instructors work in physical fitness facilities, health clubs, and fitness centers located in the amusement ... specialize in a certain training type, training philosophy, performance type, exercise modality, or client population ... In general, most personal trainers develop exercise prescription plans for aerobic exercise, resistance exercise, and/or flexibility training ...
Soft Tissue Therapy - Treatment Strategies - Exercise Prescription
... Dependent on assessment findings, some clients may be required to undertake a series of exercises, to strengthen, or simply to "switch-on" particular muscles or muscle ...
Exercise Prescription - Exercise Program Development
... Exercise prescription is designed to modulate acute exercise programming variables to create the adaptations desired by the individual or sport ... With aerobic exercise prescription, the type of exercise, duration of exercise, frequency, and duration is adjusted ... For resistance exercise prescription, the type of exercise, total session volume, rest period, frequency, and intensity are determined ...

Famous quotes containing the words prescription and/or exercise:

    Women are taught that their main goal in life is to serve others—first men, and later, children. This prescription leads to enormous problems, for it is supposed to be carried out as if women did not have needs of their own, as if one could serve others without simultaneously attending to one’s own interests and desires. Carried to its “perfection,” it produces the martyr syndrome or the smothering wife and mother.
    Jean Baker Miller (20th century)

    To exercise power costs effort and demands courage. That is why so many fail to assert rights to which they are perfectly entitled—because a right is a kind of power but they are too lazy or too cowardly to exercise it. The virtues which cloak these faults are called patience and forbearance.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)