Exercise Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage

Exercise induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH), also known as "bleeding" or a "bleeding attack", refers to the presence of blood in the airways of the lung in association with exercise. EIPH is common in horses undertaking intense exercise, but it has also been reported in human athletes, racing camels and racing greyhounds. Horses that experience EIPH may also be referred to as “bleeders” or as having “broken a blood vessel”. In the majority of cases EIPH is not apparent unless an endoscopic examination of the airways is performed following exercise. However, a small proportion of horses may show bleeding at the nostrils after exercise, which is known as epistaxis.

Read more about Exercise Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage:  EIPH in Horses, Prevalence of EIPH in Horses, Clinical Signs, Etiology, Risk Factors For EIPH, Effects of EIPH On Performance, Management and Treatment

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Exercise Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage - Management and Treatment
... Furosemide (Lasix) has been used to prevent the condition, although it does not work in 50% of cases, and it is banned in some countries ... Other treatments that have been used include bronchodilators, coagulants, and estrogen ...

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