Eric Hobsbawm - Works

Works

Hobsbawm wrote extensively on many subjects as one of Britain's most prominent historians. As a Marxist historiographer he has focused on analysis of the "dual revolution" (the political French Revolution and the British industrial revolution). He saw their effect as a driving force behind the predominant trend towards liberal capitalism today. Another recurring theme in his work was social banditry, a phenomenon that Hobsbawm tried to place within the confines of relevant societal and historical context, thus countering the traditional view of it being a spontaneous and unpredictable form of primitive rebellion. He also coined the term "long nineteenth century", which begins with the French Revolution in 1789 and ended with the start of The Great War in 1914.

Outside his academic historical writing, Hobsbawm wrote a regular column (under the pseudonym Francis Newton, taken from the name of Billie Holiday's communist trumpet player, Frankie Newton) for the New Statesman as a jazz critic, and time to time over popular music such as with his "Beatles and before" article. He published numerous essays in various intellectual journals, dealing with subjects such as barbarity in the modern age, the troubles of labour movements, and the conflict between anarchism and communism. Among his final publications were Globalisation, Democracy and Terrorism (2007), On Empire (2008), and the collection of essays How to Change the World: Marx and Marxism 1840–2011 (2011).

Read more about this topic:  Eric Hobsbawm

Other articles related to "works, work":

Zacharias Werner - Works
... der Unkraft, 1813, a recantation of his earlier work Martin Luther Kunigunde die Heilige, 1815 Geistliche Übungen für drei Tage, 1818 Die Mutter der Makkabäer ...
Works Progress Administration
... The Works Progress Administration (renamed during 1939 as the Works Project Administration WPA) was the largest and most ambitious New Deal agency, employing millions of unskilled ... and state histories, artists painted murals and other works for new federal post offices and other buildings ...
Norman Rockwell - Body of Work
... Norman Rockwell was a prolific artist, producing over 4,000 original works in his lifetime ... Most of his works are either in public collections, or have been destroyed in fire or other misfortunes ... America), were only slightly overshadowed by his most popular of calendar works the "Four Seasons" illustrations for Brown Bigelow that were published for 17 years ...
Ignacy Krasicki - Fame
... Krasicki's major works won European fame and were translated into Latin, French, German, Italian, Russian, Czech, Croatian, Slovene, Hungarian ... The broad reception of his works was sustained throughout the 19th century ... Krasicki has been the subject of works by poets of the Polish Enlightenment – Stanisław Trembecki, Franciszek Zabłocki, Wojciech Mier – and in the 20th century, by ...
Figured Bass - Basso Continuo
... The titles of many Baroque works make mention of the continuo section, such as J ... at least in modern performances, is harpsichord and cello for instrumental works and secular vocal works, such as operas, and organ for sacred music ... In addition, the mere composition of certain works seems to require certain kind of instruments (for instance, Vivaldi's Stabat Mater seems to require an organ, and not a harpsichord) ...

Famous quotes containing the word works:

    They commonly celebrate those beaches only which have a hotel on them, not those which have a humane house alone. But I wished to see that seashore where man’s works are wrecks; to put up at the true Atlantic House, where the ocean is land-lord as well as sea-lord, and comes ashore without a wharf for the landing; where the crumbling land is the only invalid, or at best is but dry land, and that is all you can say of it.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    We all agree now—by “we” I mean intelligent people under sixty—that a work of art is like a rose. A rose is not beautiful because it is like something else. Neither is a work of art. Roses and works of art are beautiful in themselves. Unluckily, the matter does not end there: a rose is the visible result of an infinitude of complicated goings on in the bosom of the earth and in the air above, and similarly a work of art is the product of strange activities in the human mind.
    Clive Bell (1881–1962)

    Reason, the prized reality, the Law, is apprehended, now and then, for a serene and profound moment, amidst the hubbub of cares and works which have no direct bearing on it;Mis then lost, for months or years, and again found, for an interval, to be lost again. If we compute it in time, we may, in fifty years, have half a dozen reasonable hours.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)