Epictetus - Influence - Acting

Acting

Epictetus' philosophy is an influence on the acting method introduced by David Mamet and William H. Macy, known as Practical Aesthetics. The main book that describes the method, The Practical Handbook for the Actor, lists the Enchiridion in the bibliography.

Read more about this topic:  Epictetus, Influence

Other articles related to "acting":

Joanna Kerns - Career - Early Roles
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Acting - Improvisation
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Jenna Von Oÿ - Early Life and Career
... She began her acting career as a child in regional stage productions and commercials ... Von Oÿ made her television acting debut in 1986 on an episode of ABC Weekend Special, followed by a guest roles on Tales from the Darkside and Kate Allie ... years before dropping out to return to acting ...
Evangeline Lilly - Career
... Lilly studied acting at The Yaletown Actors Lab ... on The View that she places writing and being a mother as top priorities, but she likes acting as a day job and she will continue acting when possible ... being womanly." She has mentioned she is uninterested in acting in nude or overly sexual scenes ...
Sean Gullette - Acting
... In 2010 he played principal roles in Blue Ridge, directed by Vincent Sweeney, and Die zwei Leben des Daniel Shore, with Nikolai Kinski and Morjana Alaoui, directed by Michael Dreher ... Gullette is rumored to be in talks to play the lead role in Tula Station, directed by Sergio Maroquin, from the award-winning novel by David Toscana, and the lead role in Lilith, a thriller from French director Fabien Martorell. ...

Famous quotes containing the word acting:

    Its idea of “production value” is spending a million dollars dressing up a story that any good writer would throw away. Its vision of the rewarding movie is a vehicle for some glamour-puss with two expressions and eighteen changes of costume, or for some male idol of the muddled millions with a permanent hangover, six worn-out acting tricks, the build of a lifeguard, and the mentality of a chicken-strangler.
    Raymond Chandler (1888–1959)

    It is probable that the principal credit of miracles, visions, enchantments, and such extraordinary occurrences comes from the power of imagination, acting principally upon the minds of the common people, which are softer.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533–1592)

    Acting is not about dressing up. Acting is about stripping bare. The whole essence of learning lines is to forget them so you can make them sound like you thought of them that instant.
    Glenda Jackson (b. 1937)