Enterprise

Enterprise (occasionally used with the archaic spelling Enterprize) may refer to:

Read more about Enterprise:  Economics and Business, Computing, In Fiction, Other

Other articles related to "enterprise":

Other Starfleet Ship Classes - Starships - NX Class
... Name Registry Depiction Enterprise NX-01 Lead ship ... Primary setting for Star Trek Enterprise ... Challenger NX-03 Mentioned in the Star Trek Enterprise novel The Romulan War Beneath the Raptor's Wing ...
Enterprise, Northwest Territories - Climate
... Climate data for Enterprise Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Average high °C (°F) −20 (−4) −14 (6) −7 (19) 4 (39) 13 (55) 20 (68) 22 (71) 20 (68) 13 (55) 4 ...
Regional Development Agency
... Government Department of Economy and Transport, in Northern Ireland by the Department of Enterprise, Trade and Investment and in Scotland by Scottish Enterprise and ... a view to future economic development being undertaken by local enterprise partnerships (LEPs) ...
Fortunate Son (Star Trek: Enterprise)
... Son" is the tenth episode (production #110) of the television series Star Trek Enterprise ... The Enterprise helps repair the Fortunate until sensors show that the 23-member crew has an additional person aboard ...
Vanguard Automotive Group
... In 2007 Enterprise agreed to purchase a controlling share in the company from Cerberus Capital Management ... A sale to rival Enterprise Rent-A-Car was completed on Aug 1, 2007, making the combined Enterprise-Alamo-National the largest US car rental operation ...

Famous quotes containing the word enterprise:

    Belonging to a group can provide the child with a variety of resources that an individual friendship often cannot—a sense of collective participation, experience with organizational roles, and group support in the enterprise of growing up. Groups also pose for the child some of the most acute problems of social life—of inclusion and exclusion, conformity and independence.
    Zick Rubin (20th century)

    Huck was always willing to take a hand in any enterprise that offered entertainment and required no capital, for he had a troublesome superabundance of that sort of time which is not money.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910)

    The chief lesson of the Depression should never be forgotten. Even our liberty-loving American people will sacrifice their freedom and their democratic principles if their security and their very lives are threatened by another breakdown of our free enterprise system. We can no more afford another general depression than we can afford another total war, if democracy is to survive.
    Agnes E. Meyer (1887–1970)