Endymion (poem)

Endymion (poem)

Endymion is a poem by John Keats first published in 1818. Beginning famously with the line "A thing of beauty is a joy for ever", Endymion, like many epic poems in English (including John Dryden's translations of Virgil and Alexander Pope's translations of Homer), is written in rhyming couplets in iambic pentameter (also known as heroic couplets). Keats based the poem on the Greek myth of Endymion, the shepherd beloved by the moon goddess Selene. The poem elaborates on the original story and renames Selene "Cynthia" (an alternative name for Artemis).

Read more about Endymion (poem):  Narrative, Critical Reception

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Endymion (poem) - Critical Reception
... Endymionreceived scathing criticism after its release, and Keats himself noted its diffuse and unappealing style (see, for example, The Quarterly Review April 1818 pp ... to leaping into the ocean to become more acquainted with his surroundings in a poemto J ... The poet Thomas Hood wrote 'Written in Keats' Endymion, in which the "Muse..charming the air to music...gave back Endymionin a dreamlike tale" ...