Emotional Tyranny


Emotional Tyranny is a phrase first used by Dr. Vincent Waldron, professor of Communication Studies at Arizona State University, to describe the use of emotion by powerful organizational members in a manner that is perceived to be destructive, controlling, unjust, and even cruel.

Waldron first mentioned emotional tyranny in Stephen Fineman's 2000 book, Emotions in Organizations. In his chapter, Waldron argues that emotions people experience in the workplace are relational. That is, organizational relationships are unique to others, and the work place provides an interesting context in which we can experience emotions. Further, relationships in organizations are created, maintained, and changed with and through emotions. Waldron conducted interviews with and observations of probation officers, staff at a bank, service workers, state employees, those living with AIDS, human service organizations serving unemployed persons, and his own experiences at the university. He found that "it is the nature of work relationships, not the nature of the task itself, that creates the highest potential for intense emotional experience, including emotional abuse."

Read more about Emotional TyrannyEmotional Relationships As Sites For Emotional Abuse For Four Reasons, What Emotional Tyranny Looks Like, See Also

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