Elizabeth Cady Stanton House Tenafly

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History Of Women In The United States - 1800–1900
... during the War of 1812, in 1814 when the British army was advancing to the White House, First Lady Dolley Madison insisted on staying until the Gilbert Stuart painting of George Washington was rescued ... his desk, his books, some paintings, and the White House silver and china ... degrees – Mary Hosford (later Fisher), Elizabeth Smith Prall (later Russell), and Mary Caroline Rudd (later Allen) – received them from Oberlin College in 1841 Oberlin College had ...

Famous quotes containing the words elizabeth cady, house, elizabeth, cady and/or stanton:

    The girl must early be impressed with the idea that she is to be “a hand, not a mouth”; a worker, and not a drone, in the great hive of human activity. Like the boy, she must be taught to look forward to a life of self-dependence, and early prepare herself for some trade or profession.
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815–1902)

    As the House is designed to provide a reflection of the mood of the moment, the Senate is meant to reflect the continuity of the past—to preserve the delicate balance of justice between the majority’s whims and the minority’s rights.
    Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908–1973)

    I consider women a great deal superior to men. Men are physically strong, but women are morally better.... It is woman who keeps the world in balance.
    Mrs. Chalkstone, U.S. suffragist. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 2, ch. 16, by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage (1882)

    I have always found that when men have exhausted their own resources, they fall back on “the intentions of the Creator.” But their platitudes have ceased to have any influence with those women who believe they have the same facilities for communication with the Divine mind as men have.
    —Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815–1902)

    The strongest reason why we ask for woman a voice in the government under which she lives; in the religion she is asked to believe; equality in social life, where she is the chief factor; a place in the trades and professions, where she may earn her bread, is because of her birthright to self-sovereignty; because, as an individual, she must rely on herself.
    —Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815–1902)