Electoral History of Richard Nixon

Electoral history of Richard Nixon, 37th President of the United States (1969–1974), 36th Vice President of the United States (1953–1961); United States Senator (1950–1953) and United States Representative (1947–1950) from California.

Read more about Electoral History Of Richard Nixon:  U.S. House, U.S. Senate, 1952 Presidential, 1956 Presidential, 1960 Presidential, 1962 California Gubernatorial, 1964 Presidential, 1968 Presidential, 1972 Presidential

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Electoral History Of Richard Nixon - 1972 Presidential
1972 Republican presidential primaries Richard Nixon (inc.) - 5,378,704 (86.92%) Unpedged - 317,048 (5.12%) John M ... National Convention (Presidential tally) Richard Nixon (inc.) - 1,347 (99.93%) Pete McCloskey - 1 (0.07%) New York Conservative Party presidential convention, 1972 Richard Nixon (inc.) - 156 (69.96%) John G ... (13.00%) Presidential candidate Party Home state Popular vote Electoral vote Running mate Count Pct Vice-presidential candidate Home state Elect ...

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    My first debate in high school—”Resolved: Girls are no good”—and I won!
    Donald Freed, U.S. screenwriter, and Arnold M. Stone. Robert Altman. Richard Nixon (Philip Baker Hall)

    The more you stay in this kind of job, the more you realize that a public figure, a major public figure, is a lonely man.
    —Richard M. Nixon (1913–1995)

    Words convey the mental treasures of one period to the generations that follow; and laden with this, their precious freight, they sail safely across gulfs of time in which empires have suffered shipwreck and the languages of common life have sunk into oblivion.
    —Anonymous. Quoted in Richard Chevenix Trench, On the Study of Words, lecture 1 (1858)

    In history the great moment is, when the savage is just ceasing to be a savage, with all his hairy Pelasgic strength directed on his opening sense of beauty;—and you have Pericles and Phidias,—and not yet passed over into the Corinthian civility. Everything good in nature and in the world is in that moment of transition, when the swarthy juices still flow plentifully from nature, but their astrigency or acridity is got out by ethics and humanity.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Nothing is more unreliable than the populace, nothing more obscure than human intentions, nothing more deceptive than the whole electoral system.
    Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 B.C.)