Educational Specialist

The Education Specialist, also referred to as Educational Specialist, Specialist in Education, or Ed.S., is an advanced terminal degree in the U.S. that is designed for individuals who wish to develop advanced knowledge and theory beyond the master's degree level, but may not wish to pursue a degree at the doctoral level. Advanced programs beyond the master's degree are designed to provide the necessary background and professional expertise for students planning to go into university teaching, supervisory or leadership roles in post secondary schools, curriculum planning, consultant work, or similar positions.

Since the course work in an Education Specialist degree is at the doctoral level many schools will transfer the credits earned directly into a doctoral degree (Ed.D, Doctor of Education).

Read more about Educational Specialist:  About, Framework, Academic Dress

Other articles related to "educational specialist":

Educational Specialist - Academic Dress
... According to The American Council on Education “six-year specialist degrees (Ed.S ... etc.) and other degrees that are intermediate between the master's and the doctor's degree may have hoods specially designed (1) intermediate in length between the master's and doctor's hood, (2) with a four-inch velvet border (also intermediate between the widths of the borders of master's and doctor's hoods), and (3) with color distributed in the usual fashion and according to the usual rules ...

Famous quotes containing the words specialist and/or educational:

    He was no specialist except in the relation of things.... He took most of his materials at second hand.... But no matter who mined the gold, the image and superscription are his.
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