Edith Hamilton

Edith Hamilton (August 12, 1867 – May 31, 1963) was a German-American educator and author who was "recognized as the greatest woman Classicist". She was sixty-two years old when The Greek Way, her first book, was published in 1930. It was instantly successful, and is the earliest expression of her belief in "the calm lucidity of the Greek mind" and "that the great thinkers of Athens were unsurpassed in their mastery of truth and enlightenment".

In 1957, when the Book-of-the-Month Club selected The Greek Way (1930) as a featured book, it enhanced her efforts at directing the American mind towards Ancient Greece, despite it having been published twenty-seven years earlier. Moreover, by then, she already had published other books, among them The Roman Way (1932), Mythology (1942), and The Echo of Greece (1957); to date, at the high school and university levels, Mythology remains the premier introductory text about its subject. The New York Times has described her as the Classical Scholar who "brought into clear and brilliant focus the Golden Age of Greek life and thought ... with Homeric power and simplicity in her style of writing".

Read more about Edith Hamilton:  Personal Life, Recognition, Works

Other articles related to "edith hamilton, hamilton":

Edith Hamilton - Works
... by Edith Hamilton and Huntington Cairns, Bollingen Series LXXI, Princeton University Press, 1961, fifth printing 1969 ...
Bryn Mawr School - School History
... who managed the daily running of the school, the Board of Managers brought Edith Hamilton from her doctoral studies in Europe to be the first Headmistress ... of the Bryn Mawr College and winner of the European Scholarship, Edith Hamilton guided the school for 26 years, from 1896–1922 ... was used in the construction of Garrett (1931), Hamilton (1953), and the North Building (2007) ...

Famous quotes containing the words edith hamilton, hamilton and/or edith:

    Theories that go counter to the facts of human nature are foredoomed.
    Edith Hamilton (1867–1963)

    Through Plato Aristotle came to believe in God, but Plato never attempted to prove His reality. Aristotle had to do so. Plato contemplated Him; Aristotle produced arguments to demonstrate Him. Plato never defined Him, but Aristotle thought God through logically and concluded with entire satisfaction to himself that He was the Unmoved Mover.
    —Edith Hamilton (1867–1963)

    The ghost of the heart of manred Cain
    And the more murderous brain
    Of Man, still redder Nero that conceived the death
    Of his mother Earth, and tore
    Her womb, to know the place where he was conceived.
    —Dame Edith Sitwell (1887–1964)