Ecological Psychology

Ecological psychology is a term claimed by several schools of psychology with the main one involving the work of James J. Gibson and his associates, and another on the work of Roger G. Barker, Herb Wright and associates at the University of Kansas in Lawrence. Whereas Gibsonian psychology is always termed Ecological Psychology, the work of Barker (and his followers) is also sometimes referred to as Environmental Psychology. There is a some overlap between the two schools, although the Gibsonian approach is more philosophical and deeply reflective on its predecessors in the history of psychology.

Both schools emphasise 'real world' studies of behaviour as opposed to the artificial environment of the laboratory.

Read more about Ecological Psychology:  Barker, Gibson

Other articles related to "psychology, ecological psychology, ecological":

Environmental Psychology - Concepts - Behavior Settings
... earliest noteworthy discoveries in the field of environmental psychology can be dated back to Roger Barker who created the field of ecological psychology ... In his book Ecological Psychology Barker stresses the importance of the town’s behavior and environment as the residents’ most ordinary instrument of describing their environment ... Barker spent his career expanding on what he called ecological psychology, identifying these behavior settings, and publishing accounts such as One Boy's Day (1952 ...
Ecological Psychology - Gibson
... He argued that animals and humans stand in a 'systems' or 'ecological' relation to the environment, such that to adequately explain some behaviour it was necessary to study the environment or niche in which the ... that the organism detects about such affordances, is central to the ecological approach to perception ... opportunities for action in the environment, that are specified by ecological information ...

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