East Rail Line

The East Rail Line (Chinese: 東鐵綫) is, the first, and one of ten railway lines of the Mass Transit Railway (MTR) system in Hong Kong. It used to be one of the three lines of the Kowloon-Canton Railway (KCR) network. It was known as the KCR British Section (九廣鐵路英段) from 1910 to 1996, and the KCR East Rail (九廣東鐵) from 1996 to 2007.

The railway line starts at Hung Hom Station in Kowloon and branches in the north at Sheung Shui to terminate at Lo Wu or Lok Ma Chau stations. Both are boundary crossing points into Shenzhen. It was the only railway line of the Kowloon-Canton Railway Corporation (KCRC) before the construction of KCR West Rail (now known as West Rail Line). After the opening of the KCR West Rail, the original KCR British Section was renamed KCR East Rail (East Rail Line) to avoid confusion.

The same railway is used for passenger and freight services crossing the boundary to other cities, including Guangzhou, Shanghai and Beijing. These longer distance passenger services (dubbed "Through Trains") start at Hung Hom and end at their termini in the mainland. The line is generally double tracked and electrified, except for certain goods sheds. Immigration and customs facilities are available at Hung Hom (for Through Train passengers) and Lo Wu/Lok Ma Chau (for border interchange passengers) stations.

The railway line was operated by Kowloon-Canton Railway Corporation (KCRC) prior to the MTR-KCR merger and has since been taken over by MTR Corporation on 2 December 2007 after the merger was completed.

The line is coloured light blue on the MTR map. The distance between Hung Hom and Lo Wu stations is 34 km.

Read more about East Rail LineRolling Stock, First Class, Stations, Future Development

Other articles related to "east rail line, east, rail, rail line":

Sheung Shui Station - Station Layout
... Complex Platforms Exit C Choi Yuen Road Exit, Tickets/Fare Adjustment Platform 1 █ East Rail Line towards Lo Wu/Lok Ma Chau Platform 2 █ East Rail Line towards Hung Hom Exit ... Platform 1 is the termination platform of the East Rail Line northbound trains after Lo Wu and Lok Ma Chau boundary crossings have closed ...
MTR EMU SP1900 - Overview
... The contract code of these trains is SP1900, based on the technology of JR East E231 series. 96 cars of 250, in 12-car configuration, 8 sets of train joining the train fleet of East Rail Line with the existing Metro Cammell EMU ... The SP1900 trains have started service on the East Rail Line since 2001 ...
East Rail Line Metro Cammell EMU
... East Rail Line Metro Cammell EMU is an electric multiple unit owned by and originally operated by the Kowloon-Canton Railway Corporation (KCRC), now operated by MTR after merger of both ... Rolling stock of this model are currently serving on the East Rail Line in Hong Kong ...
MTR Bus - Operation
... feeder bus services for the convenience of passengers using MTR rail networks ... The MTRC's integrated fare system also allows East Rail Line, West Rail Line and Light Rail passengers who use Octopus cards to enjoy the free feeder bus services that link many housing ... The Corporation operates a total of 13 routes, including West Rail Line and Light Rail feeder bus services, as well as an additional 4 East Rail Line feeder routes ...
East Rail Line - Future Development
... In the latest Sha Tin to Central Link proposal, the East Rail Line will extend southwards across the Victoria Harbour, and have two more stations on Hong Kong Island Exhibition and Admiralty ...

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