East England

Some articles on east, england, east england:

LB Camden - Transport
... International and Kings Cross are the London termini for the West Coast, Midland and East Coast Main Lines and also High Speed 1 ... This connects the borough with the East of England, East Midlands, West Midlands, North East West England, Scotland, South East England, Northern France and Brussels ... This will link more places in Southern England to the borough and to the East of England ...
The Local Authority Leaders' Boards
... East of England London South East South West East Midlands West Midlands Yorkshire and the Humber North East North West The current leaders' boards are East of England Local Government ...
CPV-TV
... Chrysalis Group media business and had bid for the East of England, London Weekday and the South and South East England franchises which were then held by Anglia Television, Thames ... of these applications after being outbid by Anglia and Meridian Broadcasting in the East of England and South East England areas ...
Chartered Institute Of Building - Membership - Novus
... UK and Ireland, its branches are as follows East Midlands East England Ireland London North East England North West England Scotland South East England South West ...
Shakespeare Schools Festival - History - 2004 London, North West, East England
... During the festival 10,000 pupils from 380 schools performed in 38 theatres. ...

Famous quotes containing the words england and/or east:

    An illiterate king is a crowned ass.
    —Medieval English proverb.

    Said by the chronicler William of Malmesbury to have been much used by King Henry I of England (1068-1135)

    At length, having come up fifty rods off, he uttered one of those prolonged howls, as if calling on the god of loons to aid him, and immediately there came a wind from the east and rippled the surface, and filled the whole air with misty rain, and I was impressed as if it were the prayer of the loon answered, and his god was angry with me; and so I left him disappearing far away on the tumultuous surface.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)