Dutch Malacca

Dutch Malacca (1641–1825) was the longest period that Malacca was under foreign control. The Dutch ruled for almost 183 years with intermittent British occupation during the Napoleonic Wars (1795–1818). This era saw relative peace with little serious interruption from the Malay kingdoms due to the understanding earlier on forged between the Dutch and the Sultanate of Johor in 1606. This time also marked the decline of the importance of Malacca. The Dutch preferred Batavia (present day Jakarta) as their economic and administrative center in the region and their hold in Malacca was to prevent the loss of the city to other European powers and subsequently the competition that would naturally come with it. Thus in the 17th century, with Malacca ceased to be an important port, the Johor Sultanate became the dominant local power in the region, due to the opening of its ports and the alliance with the Dutch.

Read more about Dutch Malacca:  Dutch Conquest of Portuguese Malacca, Administration of Malacca, Stad En Kasteel Malacca

Other articles related to "dutch malacca, dutch":

Dutch Malacca - Stad En Kasteel Malacca
... The Dutch improved and expanded the Portuguese fortress and built walls to protect the harbor and expanded city ...
Johor Sultanate - Dutch Malacca
... In the early 17th century, the Dutch reached Southeast Asia ... At that time the Dutch were at war with the Portuguese and allied themselves to Johor ... Two treaties were signed by Admiral Cornelis Matelief de Jonge on behalf of the Dutch Estates General and Raja Bongsu (Raja Seberang) of Johor in May and September 1606 ...

Famous quotes containing the word dutch:

    The French courage proceeds from vanity—the German from phlegm—the Turkish from fanaticism & opium—the Spanish from pride—the English from coolness—the Dutch from obstinacy—the Russian from insensibility—but the Italian from anger.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788–1824)