Dushman (1971 Film) - Plot

Plot

Surjit Singh Rajesh Khanna earns his living driving a truck, most of the time while consuming alcohol. One night he stops at Courtesan Chamelibai's Bindu, drinks, goes to bed with her, and gets up behind schedule, so he rushes out, drives his truck and accidentally kills a farmer named Ram Din. He is arrested by the police, charged, and brought before the courts. The Judge finds him guilty and sentences him the maximum time under the Indian Penal Code for 100 years - with a difference, he is not to spend time in jail but must labor to look after the surviving family members of Ram Din, which include his widow, Malti Meena Kumari; his sister, Kamla Kumari Naaz; two young sons; a crippled father Ganga Din Nana Palsikar and his blind wife Leela Mishra. A horrified Surjit attempts to convince the Judge to change his ruling, but in vain and he is transported to his new penitentiary where he meets with hostile villagers who would rather kill him than let him toil on their sacred land. But with police protection, he is permitted to go to Ganga Din's house, where he faces even more hostility, not fed, and given a new name "Dushman" (Enemy). That night Surjit plans to escape from the clutches of this destitute family, but he is apprehended and brought back to serve his time. Surjit must now come to terms with the fate that he has created for himself and this poor family - to work for their livelihood and live under their ever unforgiving eyes for the rest of his life.He starts working for the family and its interest. He prevents family from the clutches of local landlord, arranges the marriage of kamla without dowry and protects the honor of family and at last is integrated with family and finds his love Phoolmati Mumtaz in the village.

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    But, when to Sin our byast Nature leans,
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    John Dryden (1631–1700)

    James’s great gift, of course, was his ability to tell a plot in shimmering detail with such delicacy of treatment and such fine aloofness—that is, reluctance to engage in any direct grappling with what, in the play or story, had actually “taken place”Mthat his listeners often did not, in the end, know what had, to put it in another way, “gone on.”
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    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)