Dulce Et Decorum Est Pro Patria Mori

Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori is a line from the Roman lyrical poet Horace's Odes (III.2.13). The line can be roughly translated into English as: "It is sweet and right to die for your country."

Read more about Dulce Et Decorum Est Pro Patria Mori:  Context, Uses in Art and Literature, Use As A Motto and Inscription

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Dulce Et Decorum Est Pro Patria Mori - Use As A Motto and Inscription
... The phrase DULCE ET DECORUM EST PATRIA MORI is carved in the monument commemorating the Battle of Wyoming (Pennsylvania) known as the Wyoming Massacre ... The 'dulce et...' is also written on a plaque on the left wall of main entrance of the Patiala Block, King Edward Medical University ... Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori" is also the motto of the following organizations Used as an inscription on the French Monument in Shillong, India for the soldiers of the 26thKhasi Labour Corps who ...

Famous quotes containing the words dulce et decorum, pro patria mori, dulce et, patria mori, patria, pro, decorum and/or dulce:

    My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
    To children ardent for some desperate glory,
    The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
    Pro patria mori.
    Wilfred Owen (1893–1918)

    It is sweet and honourable to die for one’s country.
    [Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori.]
    Horace [Quintus Horatius Flaccus] (65–8 B.C.)

    My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
    To children ardent for some desperate glory,
    The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
    Pro patria mori.
    Wilfred Owen (1893–1918)

    My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
    To children ardent for some desperate glory,
    The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
    Pro patria mori.
    Wilfred Owen (1893–1918)

    My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
    To children ardent for some desperate glory,
    The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
    Pro patria mori.
    Wilfred Owen (1893–1918)

    The upbeat lawyer/negotiator of preadolescence has become a real pro by now—cynical, shrewd, a tough cookie. You’re constantly embroiled in a match of wits. You’re exhausted.
    Ron Taffel (20th century)

    It is sweet and honourable to die for one’s country.
    [Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori.]
    Horace [Quintus Horatius Flaccus] (65–8 B.C.)

    My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
    To children ardent for some desperate glory,
    The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
    Pro patria mori.
    Wilfred Owen (1893–1918)