Duchamp

  • (noun): French artist who immigrated to the United States; a leader in the Dada movement in New York City; was first to exhibit commonplace objects as art (1887-1968).
    Synonyms: Marcel Duchamp

Some articles on duchamp:

Alexina Duchamp
... Alexina "Teeny" Duchamp (January 6, 1906 – 1995) was the second wife of artist and chess player, Marcel Duchamp ...
Arturo Schwarz - Selected Works
... (Editor) The Complete Works of Marcel Duchamp, H ... Marcel Duchamp Sixty-six Creative Years From the First Painting to the Last Drawing, Gallery Schwarz (Milan, Italy), 1972 ... New York Dada Duchamp, Man Ray, Picabia, Prestel Verlag (Munich, Germany), 1973 ...
Anemic Cinema
... Cinéma (1926) is a Dadaist, surrealist, or experimental film made by Marcel Duchamp ... film depicts whirling animated drawings -- which Duchamp called Rotoreliefs -- alternated with puns in French ... Duchamp signed the film with his alter ego name of Rrose Sélavy ...
Scott Kildall - Career
... In 2010, Kildall also created “Playing Duchamp,” a chess computer that plays as if it were French artist Marcel Duchamp ... Kildall used the recorded matches of Duchamp to mimic the artist’s chess style ...
Late Modernism - Movements Associated With Postmodern Art - Conceptual Art
... Duchamp can be seen as a precursor to conceptual art ... Marcel Duchamp famously gave up "art" in favor of chess ... the game was played between John Cage and Marcel Duchamp ...

Famous quotes containing the word duchamp:

    The chess pieces are the block alphabet which shapes thoughts; and these thoughts, although making a visual design on the chess-board, express their beauty abstractly, like a poem.... I have come to the personal conclusion that while all artists are not chess players, all chess players are artists.
    —Marcel Duchamp (1887–1968)

    The individual, man as a man, man as a brain, if you like, interests me more than what he makes, because I’ve noticed that most artists only repeat themselves.
    —Marcel Duchamp (1887–1968)

    Living is more a question of what one spends than what one makes.
    —Marcel Duchamp (1887–1968)