Driver Deaths in Motorsport

Driver Deaths In Motorsport

Due to the inherently dangerous nature of auto racing, many individuals, including drivers, crew members, officials and spectators, have been killed in crashes related to the sport, in races, in qualifying, in practice or in private testing sessions. Deaths among racers and spectators were numerous in the early years of racing. However advances in safety technology, and specifications designed by sanctioning bodies to limit speeds, have reduced deaths in recent years. Spectacular accidents have often spurred increased safety measures and even rules changes. The worst motorsports accident was Pierre Levegh's 1955 crash at Le Mans that killed him and around 80 spectators with over 100 being injured.

The five tracks with the most competitor fatalities
1 Indianapolis Motor Speedway 56
2 Nürburgring 48
3 Monza 30
4= Daytona International Speedway 24
Le Mans 24

This is a list alphabetically sorted, and structured after the kind of competition, of the more notable drivers, excluding motorcycle riders. In addition, several famous racing drivers have been killed in public road crashes; see List of people who died in road accidents.

Contents
Top · A · B · C · D · E · F · G · H · I · J · K · L · M · N · O · P · Q · R · S · T · U · V · W · X · Y · Z
Open wheel types · Champ Car · Formula One · Formula 2 · Formula 3000 · Indy Racing League · Stock car types
Drag · Endurance · Grand Touring and sportscar racing · Hillclimbing · British National Series · Sprint cars

Read more about Driver Deaths In Motorsport:  A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, Y, Z, Hillclimbing, Sprint Cars

Famous quotes containing the words driver and/or deaths:

    God help the horse, and the driver too!
    And the people and beasts who have never a friend!
    For the driver easily might have been you,
    And the horse be me by a different end!
    And nobody knows how their days will cease!
    And the poor, when they’re old, have little of peace!
    James Kenneth Stephens (1882–1950)

    As deaths have accumulated I have begun to think of life and death as a set of balance scales. When one is young, the scale is heavily tipped toward the living. With the first death, the first consciousness of death, the counter scale begins to fall. Death by death, the scales shift weight until what was unthinkable becomes merely a matter of gravity and the fall into death becomes an easy step.
    Alison Hawthorne Deming (b. 1946)