Doubles (bells)

Doubles (bells)

Change ringing is the art of ringing a set of tuned bells in a series of mathematical patterns called "changes". It differs from many other forms of campanology (such as carillon ringing) in that no attempt is made to produce a conventional melody.

Today, change ringing can be found all over the world, performed in a variety of media; but it remains most popular in the context where, in the 17th century, it developed: English church towers. These typically contain a few large bells rigged to swing freely: a ring of bells. The considerable inertias involved mean that each bell usually requires its own ringer. Thus, contrasted with a carillon, in which a large number of bells are struck by hammers, all tied in to a central framework so that one carillonneur can control them all, a set of such bells is comparatively unwieldy— hence the emergence of permutations rather than melody as an organizing principle.

Read more about Doubles (bells):  The Mechanics of Change Ringing On Tower Bells, Permuting The Bells, History and Modern Culture of Change Ringing, Change Ringing in Literature and Television

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Doubles (bells) - Change Ringing in Literature and Television
... Connie Willis, who frequently and overtly references Sayers in To Say Nothing of the Dog (1997), features bell ringers in her earlier novel Doomsday Book (1992) a group of American women led by a Mrs ... Taylor frequently appears practising for or ringing both handbells and changes ...

Famous quotes containing the word doubles:

    For the poison of hatred seated near the heart doubles the burden for the one who suffers the disease; he is burdened with his own sorrow, and groans on seeing another’s happiness.
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