Doctor of Humane Letters

The degree of Doctor of Humane Letters (Latin: Litterarum humanarum doctor; D.H.L.; or L.H.D.) is always conferred as an honorary degree, usually to those who have distinguished themselves in areas other than science, government, literature or religion, which are awarded degrees of Doctor of Science, Doctor of Laws, Doctor of Letters, or Doctor of Divinity, respectively.

Doctor of Humane Letters degrees should not be confused with earned academic degrees awarded on the basis of research, such as Doctor of Philosophy or Doctor of Theology, or earned professional doctorates such as Doctor of Medicine, Juris Doctor, Doctor of Ministry, etc.

Academic degrees
First-tier
  • Associate degree
  • Foundation degree
Second-tier
  • Bachelor's degree
Third-tier
  • DEA
  • Diplom
  • Engineer's degree
  • Magister
  • Master's degree
Fourth-tier
  • Doctoral degree
  • Terminal degree
Other
  • Honorary degree
  • Licentiate
  • Professional doctorate
  • Professorial degree
  • Professional degree
  • Specialist degree


Other articles related to "doctor of humane letters":

Hobart And William Smith Colleges - Honorary Degree Recipients - Doctor of Humane Letters
... James Grant Wilson, L.H.D ... (litterarum humanarum doctor) ...

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