Doctor of Civil Law

Doctor of Civil Law is a degree offered by some universities, such as the University of Oxford, instead of the more common Doctor of Laws (LL.D.) degrees.

At Oxford, the degree of Doctor of Civil Law by Diploma is customarily conferred on foreign Heads of State, as well as on the Chancellor of the University. (The British Sovereign is unable to receive university degrees, since these would, theoretically, place her under the jurisdiction of the Chancellor of the university. Prior to her accession, the present Queen did accept several honorary degrees, including an Oxford DCL in 1948).

The degree is a higher doctorate usually awarded on the basis of exceptionally insightful and distinctive publications that contain significant and original contributions to the study of law or politics in general. The degree of Doctor of Canon Law was replaced by the DCL after the Reformation.

The DCL is senior to all degrees save the Doctor of Divinity which was traditionally the highest degree bestowed by the Universities.

In some other universities, the DCL is an honorary degree.

The following other higher institutions also grant DCL:

  • University of Durham, United Kingdom
  • University of Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
  • University of Kent, Kent, United Kingdom
  • McGill University Faculty of Law, Montreal, Quebec Canada
  • Louisiana State University Paul M. Hebert Law Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA
  • Pontifical Lateran University, Rome
  • Royal and Pontifical University of Santo Tomas, Philippines
  • Yale University School of Law


Famous quotes containing the words doctor of, law, doctor and/or civil:

    The doctor of Geneva stamped the sand
    That lay impounding the Pacific swell,
    Patted his stove-pipe hat and tugged his shawl.
    Wallace Stevens (1879–1955)

    It seems to be a law of nature that no man, unless he has some obvious physical deformity, ever is loth to sit for his portrait.
    Max Beerbohm (1872–1956)

    A doctor, like anyone else who has to deal with human beings, each of them unique, cannot be a scientist; he is either, like the surgeon, a craftsman, or, like the physician and the psychologist, an artist.... This means that in order to be a good doctor a man must also have a good character, that is to say, whatever weaknesses and foibles he may have, he must love his fellow human beings in the concrete and desire their good before his own.
    —W.H. (Wystan Hugh)

    Consider what you have in the smallest chosen library. A company of the wisest and wittiest men that could be picked out of all civil countries in a thousand years have set in best order the results of their learning and wisdom. The men themselves were hid and inaccessible, solitary, impatient of interruption, fenced by etiquette; but the thought which they did not uncover in their bosom friend is here written out in transparent words to us, the strangers of another age.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)