Dismal River National Forest

Dismal River National Forest was established as the Dismal River Forest Reserve by the General Land Office in Nebraska on April 16, 1902 with 85,123 acres (344.48 km2). After the transfer of federal forests to the U.S. Forest Service in 1905, it became a National Forest on March 4, 1907. On July 1, 1908 the lands were transferred to Nebraska National Forest.

Other articles related to "river, rivers":

3M - Environmental Record
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Volga River - Description
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Murray River
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Yazoo River
... The Yazoo River is a river in the U.S ... The Yazoo River was named by French explorer La Salle in 1682 as "Rivière des Yazous" in reference to the Yazoo tribe living near the river's mouth ... One long held belief is that it means "river of death" ...

Famous quotes containing the words forest, national, dismal and/or river:

    Master of all sorts of wood-craft, he seemed a part of the forest and the lake, and the secret of his amazing skill seemed to be that he partook of the nature and fierce instincts of the beasts he slew.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    It is not unkind to say, from the standpoint of scenery alone, that if many, and indeed most, of our American national parks were to be set down on the continent of Europe thousands of Americans would journey all the way across the ocean in order to see their beauties.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945)

    O, I have passed a miserable night,
    So full of fearful dreams, of ugly sights,
    That, as I am a Christian faithful man,
    I would not spend another such a night
    Though ‘twere to buy a world of happy days,
    So full of dismal terror was the time.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    The river sweats
    Oil and tar
    The barges drift
    With the turning tide
    —T.S. (Thomas Stearns)