Directive Principles and Fundamental Duties of India

Some articles on directive principles, fundamental:

Fundamental Rights, Directive Principles And Fundamental Duties Of India - Relationship Between The Fundamental Rights, Directive Principles and Fundamental Duties
... The Directive Principles have been used to uphold the Constitutional validity of legislations in case of a conflict with the Fundamental Rights ... Amendment in 1971, provided that any law made to give effect to the Directive Principles in Article 39(b)–(c) would not be invalid on the grounds that they derogated from the Fundamental ... of this article was sought to be extended to all the Directive Principles by the 42nd Amendment in 1976, but the Supreme Court struck down the extension as ...

Famous quotes containing the words india, duties, principles and/or fundamental:

    India is an abstraction.... India is no more a political personality than Europe. India is a geographical term. It is no more a united nation than the Equator.
    Winston Churchill (1874–1965)

    The intent of matrimony, is not for man and wife to be always taken up with each other, but jointly to discharge the duties of civil society, to govern their family with prudence, and educate their children with discretion.
    Anonymous, U.S. women’s magazine contributor. Weekly Visitor or Ladies Miscellany (June 1807)

    Struggle is the father of all things.... It is not by the principles of humanity that man lives or is able to preserve himself above the animal world, but solely by means of the most brutal struggle.
    Adolf Hitler (1889–1945)

    In this choice of inheritance we have given to our frame of polity the image of a relation in blood; binding up the constitution of our country with our dearest domestic ties; adopting our fundamental laws into the bosom of our family affections; keeping inseparable and cherishing with the warmth of all their combined and mutually reflected charities, our state, our hearths, our sepulchres, and our altars.
    Edmund Burke (1729–1797)