Dictator Game - Challenges

Challenges

The idea that the highly mixed results of the Dictator game prove or disprove rationality in economics is not widely accepted. Results offer both support of the classical assumptions and notable exception which have led to improved holistic economic models of behavior. Some authors have suggested that giving in the dictator game does not entail that individuals wish to maximize others' benefit (altruism). Instead they suggest that individuals have some negative utility associated with being seen as greedy, and are avoiding this judgment by the experimenter. Some experiments have been performed to test this hypothesis with mixed results.

Further experiments testing experimental effects have been performed. Bardsley has performed experiments where individuals are given the opportunity to give money, give nothing, or take money from the respondent. In these cases most individuals far from showing altruism actually take money. And comparing the taking games with dictator games which start from the same endowments, most people who give in the dictator game would take in a taking game. Bardsley suggests two interpretations for these results. First, it may be that the range of options provides different cues to experimental subjects about what is expected of them. "Subjects might perceive dictator games as being about giving, since they can either do nothing or give, and so ask themselves how much to give. Whilst the taking game... might appear to be about taking for analogous reasons, so subjects ask themselves how much to take." On this interpretation dictator game giving is a response to demand characteristics of the experiment. Second, subjects' behavior may be affected by a kind of framing effect. What a subject considers to be an appropriately kind behavior depends on the range of behaviors available. In the taking game, the range includes worse alternatives than the dictator game. As a result giving less, or even taking, may appear equally kind.

Read more about this topic:  Dictator Game

Other articles related to "challenges, challenge":

Peter The Rock - Catholic View - Challenges - Schism
... The papacy's most widely-known crisis, as well as its largest challenge to authority, came with the "Great Western Schism" (also known as the "Papal ...
Challenges - Other Uses
... Challenge (gasoline), a New Zealand gasoline brand Challenge (literature), an attempt to remove or restrict access to literary materials Challenge (NFL), when a head coach requests the referees review a play ...
Top Gear Test Track - Usage
... in other portions of the programme, especially in testing cars and in challenges ... Cars acquired during challenges must often post lap times (driven by either one of the presenters or The Stig) around the track against either a target time or a time set by The Stig in another vehicle ... During many challenges, the track is used in more unorthodox fashion — for instance, serving as a makeshift motorway lane during a challenge testing ...
Project Runway Canada (season 2) - Challenges - Episode 11: The Final Three
... The final three designers - Sunny, Jessica and Jason - are given six months to construct a 12-piece collection for a runway show at Toronto's Fashion Week ... With eight weeks until the show, the designers are discouraged when mentor Brian criticizes their garments ...
Collaborative Problem Solving
... approach to understanding and helping children with behavioral challenges that was first articulated by Dr ... The CPS model views behavioral challenges as a form of learning disability or developmental delay -- in other words, behaviorally challenging kids are lacking crucial cognitive skills, especially in ... behavior management in youth with a variety of behavioral challenges, including youth with bipolar disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Asperger's disorder ...

Famous quotes containing the word challenges:

    A powerful idea communicates some of its strength to him who challenges it.
    Marcel Proust (1871–1922)

    The approval of the public is to be avoided like the plague. It is absolutely essential to keep the public from entering if one wishes to avoid confusion. I must add that the public must be kept panting in expectation at the gate by a system of challenges and provocations.
    André Breton (1896–1966)