Diagon - Diagon Alley - Madam Malkin's Robes For All Occasions

Madam Malkin's Robes For All Occasions

Madam Malkin's is a clothing shop next to Flourish & Blotts. It sells robes and other clothing, including the standard Hogwarts-required plain black work robes, and dress robes. Madam Malkin, a squat witch who wears mauve robes, and her assistants will tailor the robes to fit right in her shop. Malkin is an archaic term for a crotchety old woman.

Harry has two meetings with Draco in Madam Malkin's shop. This is where Harry meets the first wizard of his own age, Malfoy, for the very first time in Philosopher's Stone. Harry is rather bewildered by the questions Draco asks, because Harry is still unfamiliar with many aspects of the wizarding world. A second meeting occurs just before the beginning of Harry's sixth year, in Half-Blood Prince. This meeting is far more unpleasant, and escalates quickly into a near-duel before Draco and his mother leave in disgust that Hermione would shop there.

Hagrid can never fit in here, so the first time he brought him there, he bought some ice creams while waiting for Harry.

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