Development of The World Chess Championship

Development Of The World Chess Championship

The concept of a world chess champion started to emerge in the first half of the 19th century, and the phrase "world champion" appeared in 1845. From this time onwards various players were acclaimed as world champions, but the first contest that was defined in advance as being for the world championship was the match between Steinitz and Zukertort in 1886. Until 1948 world championship contents were matches arranged privately between the players. As a result the players also had to arrange the funding, in the form of stakes provided by enthusiasts who wished to bet on one of the players. In the early 20th century this was sometimes a barrier that prevent or delayed challenges for the title.

Between 1888 and 1948 various difficulties that arose in match negotiations led players to try to define agreed rules for matches, including the frequency of matches, how much or how little say the champion had in the conditions for a title match and what the stakes and division of the purse should be. However, these attempts were unsuccessful in practise, as the same issues continued to delay or prevent challenges.

The first attempt by an external organization to manage the world championship was in 1887–1889, but this experiment was not repeated. A system for managing regular contests for the title went into operation in 1948, under the control of FIDE, and functioned quite smoothly until 1993. However, in that year reigning champion Kasparov and challenger Short were so dissatisfied with FIDE's arrangements for their match that they set up a break-away organization. The split in the world championship continued until 2006.

Read more about Development Of The World Chess ChampionshipFinancing of Championship Contests, Early Uses of "World Champion", The Reign of Wilhelm Steinitz, The Lasker Controversies, Capablanca's Attempts To Produce Agreed Rules, FIDE, Euwe and AVRO, Birth of FIDE's World Championship Cycle, Split Title 1993–2005, FIDE System Since 2006

Other articles related to "development of the world chess championship, world chess championship, world, the world chess championship":

Development Of The World Chess Championship - FIDE System Since 2006
... Further information World Chess Championship 2006, World Chess Championship 2007, World Chess Championship 2008, World Chess Championship 2010, World Chess ... Kramnik thus became the first unified and undisputed World Chess Champion since Kasparov split from FIDE to form the PCA in 1993 ... Kramnik played to defend his title at the World Chess Championship 2007 in Mexico ...

Famous quotes containing the words development of the, development of, chess, world and/or development:

    There are two things which cannot be attacked in front: ignorance and narrow-mindedness. They can only be shaken by the simple development of the contrary qualities. They will not bear discussion.
    John Emerich Edward Dalberg, 1st Baron Acton (1834–1902)

    They [women] can use their abilities to support each other, even as they develop more effective and appropriate ways of dealing with power.... Women do not need to diminish other women ... [they] need the power to advance their own development, but they do not “need” the power to limit the development of others.
    Jean Baker Miller (20th century)

    Women’s childhood relationships with their fathers are important to them all their lives. Regardless of age or status, women who seem clearest about their goals and most satisfied with their lives and personal and family relationships usually remember that their fathers enjoyed them and were actively interested in their development.
    —Stella Chess (20th century)

    Feminism is an entire world view or gestalt, not just a laundry list of women’s issues.
    Charlotte Bunch (b. 1944)

    Understanding child development takes the emphasis away from the child’s character—looking at the child as good or bad. The emphasis is put on behavior as communication. Discipline is thus seen as problem-solving. The child is helped to learn a more acceptable manner of communication.
    Ellen Galinsky (20th century)