Design - Design As A Process - The Rational Model - Example Sequence of Stages

Example Sequence of Stages

Typical stages consistent with The Rational Model include the following.

  • Pre-production design
    • Design brief or Parti pris – an early (often the beginning) statement of design goals
    • Analysis – analysis of current design goals
    • Research – investigating similar design solutions in the field or related topics
    • Specification – specifying requirements of a design solution for a product (product design specification) or service.
    • Problem solving – conceptualizing and documenting design solutions
    • Presentation – presenting design solutions
  • Design during production
  • Post-production design feedback for future designs
    • Implementation – introducing the designed solution into the environment
    • Evaluation and conclusion – summary of process and results, including constructive criticism and suggestions for future improvements
  • Redesign – any or all stages in the design process repeated (with corrections made) at any time before, during, or after production.

Each stage has many associated best practices.

Read more about this topic:  Design, Design As A Process, The Rational Model

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